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Mourne Walks

Image of mountains on the borders of The North of Ireland.

Questions:

If you have a question about walking in the Mountains of Mourne please mail me directly or  ask me in the comments below. If I can do anything to answer or help, then I will.

What’s the plan?

The Walks And More: About 25 years ago, under contract, and having been paid a very healthy advance,  I wrote a book about walking in the Mountains of Mourne. I was living in the area, and as a diversion from the usual commercial writing and training, researching the book was very satisfying. Unfortunately for a variety of reasons it never made it to the bookshelves. I’m going to try to remedy that. Or at least attempt to get the routes published in some form.

Some of the walk routes, should begin appear here by early 2017, with the rest following during the year. Then during  2018 I plan on adding articles & features designed to help new walkers enjoy routes away from the confines of the Mourne Wall and the heavily beaten paths.  And to go on and write features on the natural and human heritage that abounds in these mountains.

Here is a fore-taste that uses a working track to get you into the heart of the wilderness, and then encourages you venture into a lesser-explored area and work across open country…

wp_20160914_11_34_32_rich_editedSlieve Muck Loop Walks (Mountains of Mourne) – This walk offers both a good introduction to following a route without way-marks, and the experience of crossing trackless open country. It starts and finishes on the old Banns Road, a green lane that penetrates deep into the mountain heart. On a clear day, there are plenty of features in the landscape to help you find your way.

Introducing Mourne : More Than Just A Skyline

In the meantime you can find a magazine feature introducing the Kingdom of Mourne and the wealth of outdoor activities you and your family can enjoy there. Click here.

Best Map for Hill Walking

There are a broad range of maps for the Mountains of Mourne, now available, some even encapsulated by local businesses, to provide additional water-proofing. My preferred map for hill walking is the Harvey Maps Superwalker.
You can read my review of it here: Harvey Maps Superwalker Map : Mourne Mountains
And if you enjoy a light quiz, this one , (which I ran on Twitter for Britain’s #NationalMapReadingWeek)  will help you discover what makes this map easier to read: #NationalMapReadingWeek : The Twitter Quiz – Answers.

The Walks

Mourne Walks : The Lecale Way – Clough to Newcastle  – A rare feast, even in Northern Ireland. A countryside walk, that falls just within the boundary of the Mourne Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It strolls you through a landscape rich in human heritage, wildlife habitat and vistas that engage you throughout the way – at any time of year. Easy, 8 miles, 3+ hours. Bus to start. Walk back.
(Added 27 October 2016 – route walked mid October 2016) 

Walk 7 : The Slieve Muck Loop Walk – This walk offers both a good introduction to following a route without way-marks, and the experience of crossing trackless open country. It starts and finishes on the old Banns Road, a green lane that penetrates deep into the mountain heart. On a clear day, there are plenty of features in the landscape to help you find your way.
(Added 25 September 2016 – First published 1993 – Routes re-walked September 2016).

Walk 9 : The Finlieve Ridge Loop Walk – Almost entirely open country. Frequent low cloud demands hill-walking experience and advanced map and compass skills.  The cloud-base can drop 1000m in less than ten minutes.
(Added 10 November 2016, awaiting sub-editing before publication – First published 1993 – Routes re-walked entirely in cloud down to 300 metres in October 2016)

Walk 2 : Spinkwee : around the yellow crag – Also for the die-hard endurance walkers with some experienced in wayfinding, there’s this. One of my two Mourne favourites. Containing one of the best “discovered views” of Mourne, probably only second to that of  John O’Donovan’s 1834 route to the summit of Donard
(Added 8 September 2016 – First published 1995 – Routes re-walked September 2014 & 2016).

Updated: 18 November 2016

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